Got Questions?

Got Questions?

The "WOD" is the "workout of the day." Each day a new WOD is posted to CrossFit.com, and it's part of a complete program designed to improve strength and conditioning. The WOD can be scaled (adjusted) to provide a suitable challenge for athletes at any level.
If you train the WODs hard, eat right and get lots of sleep, you will definitely gain lean mass and lose fat. And yes, you can build muscle mass with the CrossFit protocol. The CrossFit protocol is designed to elicit a substantial neuroendocrine wallop and hence packs an anabolic punch that puts on impressive amounts of muscle, though that is not our concern. Strength is. Those athletes who train for function end up with better form than those who value form over function. This is one of the beautiful ironies of training.
The WOD is a starting point, and each athlete will need to experiment to determine what "enough" means. Top athletes training for the CrossFit Games might need additional work to improve their fitness, while new athletes might need to reduce the volume of the WOD to optimize results. The exact amount of work can be determined with the assistance of an expert coach at a CrossFit affiliate, or it can be determined by carefully logging your workouts and evaluating the results. Part of the CrossFit philosophy includes pursuing or learning another sport or activity, and the demands of those sports will affect what you can do in each WOD. If you pursue another activity, you will need to balance your work/rest cycles and be sure to allow for recovery. Sometimes, you will need to take extra days off, or to consider a WOD as "active rest" done at a lower intensity.
When substituting aerobic exercises, use comparable time intervals. For example, if you run 400 meters in 90 seconds, row, bike, jump rope, run stairs, etc. for 90 seconds. Box jumps, cross-country skiing, heavy-bag work, kettlebell or dumbbell swings, weighted stair climbing or box stepping can also be used if other options are not available. Sumo deadlift high pulls can take the place of a rowing machine. Use 45 lb. for men and 35 lb. for women, and count each rep as 10 meters.
A pood is a Russian unit of measurement used for kettlebells. Common conversions: 1 pood = 36 lb.; 1.5 pood = 54 lb.; 2 pood = 72 lb. Approximate dumbbell equivalents are 35, 55 and 70.
Pull-ups and dips. Common rep schemes often equate a certain number of pull-ups plus a certain number of dips with 1 muscle-up. The exact numbers will depend on the athlete. Again, the goal is to preserve the stimulus of the original movement.
Support all or most of your body while working up to handstand push-ups. You can place your hands on the floor and your legs on a bench, ball or counter (bend at the waist). You can hook your toes over a bar in the power rack or Smith machine. You can do partial reps, building up to full range of motion; for example, stack a few books up under your head and lower to the books. Try to remove a book from the pile every workout or so until you are working from the floor. You can also substitute standing presses using absolutely no leg drive, but presses are not as good as working toward the actual motion.
Since CrossFit.com went up in 2001, equipment has become far easier to find. A host of online retailers cater to our community, and many general fitness stores also have what you need. Athletes in more remote locations might have fewer options, but retailers are working to address growing markets around the world. If retailers don't ship to your area, send an email asking them to start.
That's up to you. Manufacturers now offer shoes designed specifically for CrossFit, and some athletes will use different shoes for different workouts. For example, weightlifting shoes have elevated, non-compressible heels. However, remember that the shoes don't make you fitter.
Tabata intervals (20 seconds of work followed by 10 seconds of rest, repeated 8 times) is applied in turn to the squat, rower, pull-ups, sit-ups and push-ups with a 1-minute rotation break between exercises. Each exercise is scored by the weakest number of reps (calories on the rower) in each of the 8 intervals. During the 1-minute rotation the clock is not stopped but kept running. The score is the total of the scores from the five stations. Some performance insights and a scoring example from Mark Twight: Lying down between exercises lowers heart rate faster than standing, sitting or walking, indicating better recovery in the short 60-second rest. Alternating upright exercise (squat, pull-up) with prone or seated exercises produces lower heart rates and allows greater overall level of work. Rowing first reduces reps on all other exercises. Rowing reps are not seriously affected if done last. Improvement happens really fast when the workout is done consistently (bi-monthly). High number of reps may be maintained for greater number of sets as fitness improves. Rep totals do not necessarily improve per set, but now I can do 6 sets of 7 pull-ups rather than doing 11, 8, 5, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, etc., which suggests that local area endurance and lactic acid tolerance improve with this protocol. Scoring Example: A total score of 53 (excellent score, by the way) is determined by adding up the lowest number of reps in any set of each exercise. 18 squats 4 pull-ups 6 push-ups 13 sit-ups 12-calorie row (use the calorie counter and call each calorie a rep) This score is a 53.