Wednesday
Nutrition Class
New material and more resources for this class.
Thrusday, March 18 at 6:30pm – $30.00
Josh – WOD 1 at the NC Sectionals
 
CrossFit
15 front squat (155lbs/105lbs)
30 kettlebell swings (16kg/12kg)
5 slam ball (20lbs)
10 front squat
20 kettlebell swings
10 slam ball
5 front squat
10 kettlebell swings
15 slam ball
 
Weightlifting – Class at 6pm
Snatch – 1 rep max
 
Endurance

 

0 thoughts on “Posted: 3/10/2010

  1. Noelle says:

    I have a murph hang over today. Any cures to speak of? I'm guessing it has to do with "combining foods" and fish oil.

  2. maria says:

    Noelle…actually, as hard as it was to get going, today's wod was good for the murph hangover.

  3. Amanda W says:

    Re: Murph Hangover
    I want to "thank" Murph for the following:
    1. Getting lost in Dutch Square despite the directions written on my hand. Apparently Murph wanted to get the best of me. Verrrry funny wise guy.

    B. (yes, I mean B, not 2): Thank you for the ripped calluses. This morning, neosporin on my hands dualed its purpose as an ointment AND hair gel. Murph, I know you were just trying to take the attention away from my sore muscles. I appreciate that.

    And 3: Thank you for giving my husband enough self confidence to beat me by 30 seconds, resulting in a "Bring-it-On" quality toe-touch in my face. Ahh, as if he needed any help with the ego. But Murph, I get it — you're sexist. And that's ok.

    So here's to you, Murph. Thanks….I think.

  4. Noelle says:

    haaahah… Amanda! Hilarious. We almost sent a search team out looking for you on your first run. I'm sure the loss was totally worth the toe-touch… would love a re-enactment on THAT one.

  5. t. says:

    Here's a portion on diet of an article (http://www.endo-resolved.com/prostaglandins.html) about inflammation and endometriosis:

    Prostaglandins and womb contractions

    Primary dysmenorrhoea (painful periods) is caused by cramping in the uterine muscles — the uterus is a muscle and like all muscles it contracts and relaxes! Women don’t usually feel these muscles contract, unless it is a particularly strong contraction. With endometriosis the pain associated with menstrual cramps is usually very intense and painful. During a contraction, blood supply to the uterus can be temporarily cut off. This deprives the muscle of oxygen, which causes pain. But why do the uterine muscles contract?

    It is caused by the series two prostaglandins. Series two prostaglandins help the uterus to shed the womb lining during menstruation by causing the contraction of the uterine muscles. Understandably, if too many of these prostaglandins are produced, then the contractions will be more severe and cause painful menstrual cramps — primary dysmenorrhoea.

    However, not all prostaglandins have this effect on the involuntary uterine muscles, which is why diet can play a big role in minimising the production of series two prostaglandins. The types of fatty acids included in your diet influence the types of prostaglandins made. For example, series two prostaglandin (the type that trigger powerful contractions of the uterus) levels are increased when animal fat is included in the diet. In contrast, series one and series three prostaglandins (the type that don’t cause uterine contractions) are produced when the diet is higher in linoleic acid, which is found naturally in tuna and salmon oil. Evening primrose oil and starflower oil are also rich sources of linoleic acid, which is why they are often recommended for women suffering from period cramps and are especially helpful for women with endometriosis.

    Prostaglandins and infertility

    One major group of hormones secreted by the normal endometrium is that of prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are required for many bodily processes, including several stages of the menstrual cycle and pregnancy.

    Prostaglandins are required for ovulation, regression of the corpus luteum (i.e., ending the monthly menstrual cycle), sperm motility, immune interaction, contraction of the uterus at birth and menstrual cramps. Endometrial implants and the endometrium of the uterus are the richest source of prostaglandin production in the body.

    However, the problem with endometrial implants includes:

    – Prostaglandins are released into the abdomen instead of inside the womb
    – Prostaglandins release by the implants seem to be out of phase with their release by the uterus
    – Prostaglandins are produced at the wrong time sending the wrong message

    For instance, there is a normal surge in prostaglandin F production at the end of the menstrual cycle, causing the effect of the corpus luteum of the ovary to die down and signalling the start of a new menstrual cycle. The implants of endometriosis produce their own prostaglandin surge several days after that of the womb lining. This may be one of the main causes of very early miscarriage.

    If a women is a few days pregnant then the endometriosis implants producing prostaglandin F would incorrectly signal the ovary to start a new menstrual cycle, causing the womb lining with the implanted egg to be expelled – and the consequence is an early miscarriage.

    Prostaglandins also play an important role in the contractions of womb and fallopian tubes. During the normal menstrual cycle, the gentle contraction of the womb and fallopian tube aids the movement of egg and sperm to the outer third of the fallopian tube where fertilisation occurs. High concentrations of endometriosis implants may prevent fertilisation. An excess of PGF2 and PGE2 could cause contractions that are too strong and expel the egg too quickly.

    Prostglandins and Diet

    You should all have had it ‘drummed into you’ by now that the KEY way to shift the production of prostaglandins from the negative (inflammatory / pain messenger / womb contracting type) to the positive (anti-inflammatory / suppress womb contractions and pain messenger type), is through your diet, and most crucially by the types of fats and oils you include in your diet.

    Several enzymes take part in the process that transforms fats into prostaglandins. These enzymes act as gatekeepers, channelling fats into the making of different prostaglandins. Like other enzymes in the body, they require specific nutrient coenzymes to do their job.

    The enzyme delta-6-desaturase acts on linoleic acid – from most vegetable, nut and seed oils – to transform it to gamma-linoleic acid (GLA). GLA is used to make the anti-inflammatory series 1 prostaglandins and also supports healthy nervous system function.

    The activity of delta-6-desaturase is affected by dietary factors. Trans-fatty acids from hydrogenated oils, too much saturated fat (found in meats, fried foods, junk foods and dairy products) in the diet, high stress, too much sugar or refined flours in the diet all slow down this enzyme down.

    Trans-fatty Acids

    Many processed foods contain trans-fatty acids. These fats slow down the activity of delta-6-desaturase. They are manufactured from vegetable oils in a process called hydrogenation, which involves the bombardment of liquid oils with hydrogen atoms to make them solid and prevent them going rancid. These trans-fats have harmful effects on the stability of cell membranes and the structure of nerve and brain cells. They also interfere with the formation of anti-inflammatory prostglandins.

    B Vitamins

    The B vitamins are crucial for the conversion of linoleic acid to GLA, which is necessary to produce beneficial prostaglandins. Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid (EFA), and it is found in foods such as fresh nuts and seeds, safflower oil, and Evening Primrose Oil.

    The B vitamins are required to convert this essential oil into a form that can be used by the body to produce the good prostaglandins.

    Bromelain and prostaglandins

    The enzyme bromelain from the stem of the pineapple, is also effective in inhibiting the inflammatory prostaglandins. In an extensive five-year study of more than 200 people experiencing inflammation as a result of surgery, traumatic injuries and wounds, 75 percent of the study participants had good to excellent improvement with bromelain; a much higher rate than that afforded by drugs. Most of the people in this study were discharged from the hospital in only eight days—half the usual amount of time. They also experienced no side effects.

  6. t. says:

    Originally posted yesterday: Sorry T, gonna have to disagree with you on that one. Now I RARELY ever take ANY kind of medicine prescription or otherwise and I completely agree that we generally completely overmedicate, HOWEVER… pain is initiated by inflammatory mediators. NSAIDS block those inflammatory mediators. Motrin doesn't do shit for bloating or bitchiness, but for severe cramps…it knocks it out quickly. I agree, muscle soreness is a very different thing from PAIN; and there are definitely potential side effects from NSAIDS, but typically these occur with misuse or overuse. Popping 600 mg of ibuprofen just cause you did Murph today is quite a different animal than being doubled over in pain from menstral cramps. Know what you're taking whether its OTC, a supplement or a prescription antibiotic. Use as directed for full duration and only when necessary. Maria

  7. t. says:

    Maria,
    Most guys know better than to even broach this topic with a woman, much less one with a medical background and certainly a better understanding of mammals than him. Not because he may be right or wrong, but because it’s probably just a losing endeavor that might end the poor fella on the couch, or worse, for a night or two. Having said that… I ain’t most guys! Ha.
    I'll elaborate on why NSAIDs should work for menstrual cramps, but actually don't… or at least not as well as or how most think.
    The inflammation mediators you refer to, prostaglandins, often referred to as "local hormones", cause actions in the body to take place. For example, PGE2 causes vascular constriction and stops blood loss. It’s the main PG that signals the arteries and veins of the muscles around the uterus to constrict and initiate menstrual cramping each month… that’s simple, restrict blood flow to muscle and it’ll cramp.
    Another, PG12, interferes with clotting and allows bleeding. Obviously these two play key roles in the female cycle each month. Each does so by stimulating two different types of actions, or inflammation, on the same type of tissues (blood vessels). This is IMPORTANT as we get into what NSAIDs can and cannot do.
    So… primary dysmenorrheal, pain associated with the monthly period, is caused by muscle cramping stimulated by the prostaglandin PGE2. PGE2 and other series 2 prostaglandins are not affected much by NSAIDs. Your body simply produces more of them to counter the minimal affects of the NSAIDs.
    But what if they did? Cramping of the muscles around the uterus is crucial in the natural shedding of the uterus wall each month. If you interfere with this part of the menstrual cycle, you’re only prolonging the symptoms.
    But the flow is decreased, so the NSAIDs must be working, right? Yes, on the PG12 that allows for the bleeding. So your motrin IS working on something. But not what’s causing your cramps. The bleeding and the cramping have nothing to do with each other. The problem is, most women correlate flow to the pain of the cramps. Again, the two are caused by different PGs.
    The bleeding is natural… why slow it? I know, I know… this is where the ladies say “easy for you to say, you’re a man”. Ok, yeah, I get it. But my point is, if you slow the process down, you’re prolonging it all. But hang in there with me, I’m going to offer some possible solutions for you in a bit.
    But first I want to hit you with this, a much simpler reason NSAIDs don’t work as well as they should for primary dysmenorrheal. It takes 2-14 days for a therapeutic response from Ibuprofen to manifest in the body. So if you take it when the cramps start, it’s not going to do anything that day anyway! Also, Ibuprofen’s half life is very short, 1-4 hours, so the dosages and times most woman take(200-800mg / 8hrs) aren’t very affective at achieving therapeutic levels either.

    So what some solutions? Diet has many factors on the severity of a woman's menstrual symptoms. Crappy foods produce an environment in the entire body ripe for PGs and their inflammation. Resist those cravings for junk food. Of course this is where I talk about other, more affetive anti-inflammatory therapies. But this kind is daily and not taken at the onset of symptoms. The fish oil, krill oil, and curumin combo Dr. Eades talked about in the article I posted yesterday is one the best thing any lady (or person) can do for herself. I don't care what your diet, Paleo, Primal, Zone, or Krispy Kreme, Omega 3 supplementation reduces inflammation and the environments that beckon the body to produce PGs.

  8. t. says:

    Here's a portion of an article (http://www.endo-resolved.com/prostaglandins.html) about inflammation and endometriosis:

    Prostaglandins and womb contractions

    Primary dysmenorrhoea (painful periods) is caused by cramping in the uterine muscles — the uterus is a muscle and like all muscles it contracts and relaxes! Women don’t usually feel these muscles contract, unless it is a particularly strong contraction. With endometriosis the pain associated with menstrual cramps is usually very intense and painful. During a contraction, blood supply to the uterus can be temporarily cut off. This deprives the muscle of oxygen, which causes pain. But why do the uterine muscles contract?

    It is caused by the series two prostaglandins. Series two prostaglandins help the uterus to shed the womb lining during menstruation by causing the contraction of the uterine muscles. Understandably, if too many of these prostaglandins are produced, then the contractions will be more severe and cause painful menstrual cramps — primary dysmenorrhoea.

    However, not all prostaglandins have this effect on the involuntary uterine muscles, which is why diet can play a big role in minimising the production of series two prostaglandins. The types of fatty acids included in your diet influence the types of prostaglandins made. For example, series two prostaglandin (the type that trigger powerful contractions of the uterus) levels are increased when animal fat is included in the diet. In contrast, series one and series three prostaglandins (the type that don’t cause uterine contractions) are produced when the diet is higher in linoleic acid, which is found naturally in tuna and salmon oil. Evening primrose oil and starflower oil are also rich sources of linoleic acid, which is why they are often recommended for women suffering from period cramps and are especially helpful for women with endometriosis.

    Prostaglandins and infertility

    One major group of hormones secreted by the normal endometrium is that of prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are required for many bodily processes, including several stages of the menstrual cycle and pregnancy.

    Prostaglandins are required for ovulation, regression of the corpus luteum (i.e., ending the monthly menstrual cycle), sperm motility, immune interaction, contraction of the uterus at birth and menstrual cramps. Endometrial implants and the endometrium of the uterus are the richest source of prostaglandin production in the body.

    However, the problem with endometrial implants includes:

    – Prostaglandins are released into the abdomen instead of inside the womb
    – Prostaglandins release by the implants seem to be out of phase with their release by the uterus
    – Prostaglandins are produced at the wrong time sending the wrong message

    For instance, there is a normal surge in prostaglandin F production at the end of the menstrual cycle, causing the effect of the corpus luteum of the ovary to die down and signalling the start of a new menstrual cycle. The implants of endometriosis produce their own prostaglandin surge several days after that of the womb lining. This may be one of the main causes of very early miscarriage.

    If a women is a few days pregnant then the endometriosis implants producing prostaglandin F would incorrectly signal the ovary to start a new menstrual cycle, causing the womb lining with the implanted egg to be expelled – and the consequence is an early miscarriage.

    Prostaglandins also play an important role in the contractions of womb and fallopian tubes. During the normal menstrual cycle, the gentle contraction of the womb and fallopian tube aids the movement of egg and sperm to the outer third of the fallopian tube where fertilisation occurs. High concentrations of endometriosis implants may prevent fertilisation. An excess of PGF2 and PGE2 could cause contractions that are too strong and expel the egg too quickly.

    Prostglandins and Diet

    You should all have had it ‘drummed into you’ by now that the KEY way to shift the production of prostaglandins from the negative (inflammatory / pain messenger / womb contracting type) to the positive (anti-inflammatory / suppress womb contractions and pain messenger type), is through your diet, and most crucially by the types of fats and oils you include in your diet.

    Several enzymes take part in the process that transforms fats into prostaglandins. These enzymes act as gatekeepers, channelling fats into the making of different prostaglandins. Like other enzymes in the body, they require specific nutrient coenzymes to do their job.

    The enzyme delta-6-desaturase acts on linoleic acid – from most vegetable, nut and seed oils – to transform it to gamma-linoleic acid (GLA). GLA is used to make the anti-inflammatory series 1 prostaglandins and also supports healthy nervous system function.

    The activity of delta-6-desaturase is affected by dietary factors. Trans-fatty acids from hydrogenated oils, too much saturated fat (found in meats, fried foods, junk foods and dairy products) in the diet, high stress, too much sugar or refined flours in the diet all slow down this enzyme down.

    Trans-fatty Acids

    Many processed foods contain trans-fatty acids. These fats slow down the activity of delta-6-desaturase. They are manufactured from vegetable oils in a process called hydrogenation, which involves the bombardment of liquid oils with hydrogen atoms to make them solid and prevent them going rancid. These trans-fats have harmful effects on the stability of cell membranes and the structure of nerve and brain cells. They also interfere with the formation of anti-inflammatory prostglandins.

    B Vitamins

    The B vitamins are crucial for the conversion of linoleic acid to GLA, which is necessary to produce beneficial prostaglandins. Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid (EFA), and it is found in foods such as fresh nuts and seeds, safflower oil, and Evening Primrose Oil.

    The B vitamins are required to convert this essential oil into a form that can be used by the body to produce the good prostaglandins.

    Bromelain and prostaglandins

    The enzyme bromelain from the stem of the pineapple, is also effective in inhibiting the inflammatory prostaglandins. In an extensive five-year study of more than 200 people experiencing inflammation as a result of surgery, traumatic injuries and wounds, 75 percent of the study participants had good to excellent improvement with bromelain; a much higher rate than that afforded by drugs. Most of the people in this study were discharged from the hospital in only eight days—half the usual amount of time. They also experienced no side effects.

  9. mike says:

    thanks tony,….how is maria gonna cook when she gets home if she is upstairs typing? you and maria need to think of someone other than yourselves.

  10. t. says:

    Oh yeah… Almost forgot. If relieving the pain of cramping is the intent, asirin may be an option. It opens vessels and reduces pain so it, with the other diet suggestions, may be a help. Mike, I've some advice for you… stop posting commnents that may elicit a bad response from the mother of your children!

  11. mike says:

    t, you are right, i will leave that to you, thanks again…julie can i come to your house for dinner, t, you go to mine and i will leave two sets of boxing gloves and mouthpieces on the front porch, maria does not keep her front hand up and the lead hook or jab is there all day.

  12. Dana says:

    Tony—interesting topic about endometriosis…I cannot believe that a man knows more about how this disease happens than I do! Ohhh my we all have alot of catching up to do! I miss you guys and gals! Is CFW having a team for Relay for Life? I am very interested in participating. Ronnie if you read this CONGRATS and THANK YOU for serving our country.

  13. maria says:

    Wow…did I open a can of worms. First of all Tony, I bow down to you. You know more about menstruation than any self-respecting man should. Luckily in my line of work, I just surgically remove the uterus and don't deal with any of this shit (I occasionally provide NSAIDS post-op) I am on your side…We overmedicate. BUT there is some pain-relieving effect of ibuprofen within 30 minutes to an hour EVEN with menstral cramps. Some of the other anti-inflammatory effects can take weeks to really take effect. The bottom line is they do work (if even partially) and although it may be short-lived, by the time they wear off the pain's gone. Do I feel bad that I may take 600mg of Ibuprofen twice a year when I'm doubled over in pain?? No way. How will I react if at that moment someone gave me a warm compress and some fish oil???It wouldn't be pretty. My point is, we can get really hung up on the "ill effects" of certain drugs, and yet we can be poisoning ourselves with "healthy supplements" that have never so much as been tested on a lab rat.

  14. Debb says:

    OMG…I am sooo sscccarred.
    Dare I say anything, Yes t. I have to say you were only missing the uterus, LOVED IT!
    After I picked myself up off the floor after reading the post (I fell right out of my chair) I know you were trying to be serious but that was funny as sh.. I have seen you squirm talking about the big U before, I am so proud! OK well now I will kiss a fish's ass for oil, that is cause I know it works coupled with minimal insuline release. After 600 mg twice a day for a week and pretty much downing 325 coated tablets every two months I know pain. This took place for 30 years, told I should have the big U taken out and be gone with it!
    HA! I held out for a fix, after 90 days I became pain and PMS free since March 09, or at least I think so, my man may say different. ok enuff said bye

  15. A FED says:

    uh. i got lost. which one of you is PMSing? Just do what my dad did…if my stomach hurt…he'd flick me in the forehead (stomach ok now) if my arm hurt…charlie horse to the thigh (arm felt good) and to think I used to think I was abused ;)!!!!!

  16. maria says:

    While we are quoting studies about NSAIDS and inflammation. A recent study looked at the effect of weight loss on pain associated with osteoarthritis in people. The took a group of obese individuals with severe pain from osteoarthritis and had them lose weight (method of wt loss unkown) Well, the expected thing happened…pain from osteoarthritis in weight-bearing joints significantly decreased (knees, hips, etc) but the interesting thing is that the pain in non-wt bearing joints (fingers) was significantly reduced as well. The conclusion was that fat stores significantly increased the pain/inflammatory cycle for chronic degenerative joint disease. Maybe it's just me but I find that really interesting…Yeah it's probably just me.

  17. t. says:

    But did the weight loss reduce the pain associated with cramps? Ha! I didn't think so. Now what Sorg? Gotcha on that one, huh?